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Change Your WoW Password

Blizzard joins the illustrious ranks of the hacked.

Even when you are in the business of fun, not every week ends up being fun. This week, our security team found an unauthorized and illegal access into our internal network here at Blizzard. We quickly took steps to close off this access and began working with law enforcement and security experts to investigate what happened.

At this time, we’ve found no evidence that financial information such as credit cards, billing addresses, or real names were compromised. Our investigation is ongoing, but so far nothing suggests that these pieces of information have been accessed.

We also know that cryptographically scrambled versions of Battle.net passwords (not actual passwords) for players on North American servers were taken. We use Secure Remote Password protocol (SRP) to protect these passwords, which is designed to make it extremely difficult to extract the actual password, and also means that each password would have to be deciphered individually. As a precaution, however, we recommend that players on North American servers change their password.

 

  • First, if Blizzard contacted all their former subscribers, I have received absolutely nothing in my inbox.

    Second, even if they do, it’s going to be blunted by all the phishing crap trying to pass itself off as Blizzard correspondence which I always receive, even though I haven’t played WoW in three years (and even on e-mail accounts I never registered with). My junk folder currently includes three Diablo III account notices (while I don’t even have that game) and two invitations to Mists of Pandaria’s beta.

    And it turns out that I’ve forgotten my password.

  • Oops! We’ve accidentally made 3 million people buy authenticators! Silly us!